"Though Mean Girls was rated PG-13 for “sexual content, language, and some teen partying,” that was a rating Paramount had to fight for, says Waters. “We had lots of battles with the ratings board on the movie. There was the line, ‘Amber D’Lessio gave a blow job to a hot dog,’ which eventually became ‘Amber D’Lessio made out with a hot dog.’ Which is somehow weirder! That’s the thing we found: When you’re trying to make a joke obey the rules and not use any bad words, it can actually become seamier, even.” Still, there were some things that Waters simply refused to change. “The line in the sand that I drew was the joke about the wide-set vagina. The ratings board said, ‘We can’t give you a PG-13 unless you cut that line.’ We ended up playing the card that the ratings board was sexist, because Anchorman had just come out, and Ron Burgundy had an erection in one scene, and that was PG-13. We told them, ‘You’re only saying this because it’s a girl, and she’s talking about a part of her anatomy. There’s no sexual context whatsoever, and to say this is restrictive to an audience of girls is demeaning to all women.’ And they eventually had to back down.”"

don’t fuck with tina fey (via brokenclocksrighttwiceaday)

phiftycent:

policymic:

16-year-old dresses as every culture and counterculture of the last 100 years

Flapper. Beatnick. Hippie. Hipster. 

In her project “Counter // Culture,” 16-year-old photographer Annalisa Hartlaub captures all the mainstream and countercultural movements that have defined the last 10 decades. The results are a stirring series of portraits that bring life to a century of women, contextualizing how the friction of mainstream and counterculture defined progression. 

Read more | Follow @policymic

Paul Simon gets me and I want to adopt him as my honorary grandpa. 

"The snake which cannot cast its skin has to die. As well the minds which are prevented from changing their opinions; they cease to be mind."

Friedrich Nietzsche (via man-of-prose)

"All life is just a progression toward, and then a recession from, one phrase—“I love you.”"

F. Scott Fitzgerald (via man-of-prose)
ummaannex:

hyperallergic:

(via Another Vandal Hits Jeff Koons Retrospective)
Last night, a graffiti writer identified by the New York Times as Christopher Johnson, 33, of Manhattan, vandalized a fourth-floor wall of the Jeff Koons retrospective at the Whitney Museum of Art. According to the Times, the NYPD said he was “arrested on charges of criminal mischief, making graffiti, possession of a graffiti instrument, and criminal nuisance … He was taken into custody by police after he struggled with the museum’s security guards.”
READ MORE

What are your thoughts on the recent vandalism at the Whitney’s Jeff Koons exhibition?

ummaannex:

hyperallergic:

(via Another Vandal Hits Jeff Koons Retrospective)

Last night, a graffiti writer identified by the New York Times as Christopher Johnson, 33, of Manhattan, vandalized a fourth-floor wall of the Jeff Koons retrospective at the Whitney Museum of Art. According to the Times, the NYPD said he was “arrested on charges of criminal mischief, making graffiti, possession of a graffiti instrument, and criminal nuisance … He was taken into custody by police after he struggled with the museum’s security guards.”

READ MORE

What are your thoughts on the recent vandalism at the Whitney’s Jeff Koons exhibition?

"Here. Here’s simple and happy. That’s what I meant to give you."

Beginners (2010)
Mike Mills

deep-dark-fears:

An anonymous fear submitted to deep dark fears.

theparisreview:

Historically, fiction has afforded writers the chance to break taboos—under the guise of the fictive, one can “talk about potentially embarrassing or even criminal personal experiences without bringing society’s censure on oneself.” So what happens when taboos fall away? “It could be we are moving towards a period where, as the writer ‘gets older’ … he or she finds it increasingly irrelevant to embark on another long work of fiction that elaborately reformulates conflicts and concerns that the reader anyway assumes are autobiographical. Far more interesting and exciting to confront the whole conundrum of living and telling head on, in the very different world we find ourselves in now, where more or less anything can be told without shame.”
For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.

theparisreview:

Historically, fiction has afforded writers the chance to break taboos—under the guise of the fictive, one can “talk about potentially embarrassing or even criminal personal experiences without bringing society’s censure on oneself.” So what happens when taboos fall away? “It could be we are moving towards a period where, as the writer ‘gets older’ … he or she finds it increasingly irrelevant to embark on another long work of fiction that elaborately reformulates conflicts and concerns that the reader anyway assumes are autobiographical. Far more interesting and exciting to confront the whole conundrum of living and telling head on, in the very different world we find ourselves in now, where more or less anything can be told without shame.”

For more of this morning’s roundup, click here.